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Lightier bodied reds-less is more

“Less is more”

As it is wise advice for us, the same applies to wine:
“Less” when referring to the weight, body and alcohol content and “more” in the transparency, the dimensions and the pleasure it brings.

As we enjoy our warm summer weather, we are leaning lean, towards this very type of wine.
While mercury rises to register three digits outside, a balanced low alcohol red wine (11%-13%) makes room for more enjoyment.
Another welcome hot-day solution is to lightly chill the bottle, which encourages positive results on the wine itself and our palates.
These parameters have inspired our unique difficult-to-find wines this month, and we bring them to you at a rare bargain.

The Appellations: Burgundy, Germany and California

The Varietals: Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir, Gamay and Corvina

Why we love them:
1)For the pure enjoyment they deliver
2)For their power of finesse- layers behind the fruit
3)They are very food friendly! 

Trio Selection for summer sipping $90 for 3 bottles
How did we go about selecting these wines for you?
We looked for the:

Power of finesse
When we say “power” we refer to complexity, dimension and length. Going beyond the primary fruit and seek secondary and tertiary flavors.

Acidity vs Tannins 
Both components offer a needed structure for safe aging, and an enhanced palate feel. Acidity takes the lead in the light body reds and plays an essential role.

Layers behind the fruit – terroir 
These layers behind the fruit emerge and are carried by the structure of the wine, remaining transparent to the wine’s birthplace and soil–limestone, clay, or sandy rich.
Two words say it all–terroir expressive.

Red fruit vs dark fruit 
Think red currant, wild cherry, strawberry, cranberry

Food friendly 
These wines can integrate, and act as a palate cleanser while inserting themselves seamlessly. Think of them as “assertive and refreshing” instead of “coating” flavors on one’s palate.

Summer Reds
The Power of Finesse

Lighter red wines are extremely rewarding to us. When we say “power” we refer to complexity, dimension and length that go beyond primary fruit and seek secondary and tertiary flavors. Behind the initial “punch,” these layers behind the fruit emerge and are carried by the structure of the wine, remaining transparent to the wine’s birthplace and soil–limestone, clay, or sandy rich etc.
Two words say it all–terroir expressive.
Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier, Trousseau, Poulsard, Gamay are a few varietals among many that are exceptional conduits of terroir.

Acidity vs Tannins
All wines measure varying acidity and different PH levels.
Each varietal also produces different concentrations of tannins that originate from grape seeds, skins and stems.
For example, Cabernet tends to produce a fair amount of tannins which translates into a robust structure. Barrel use and aging helps round-out the wine.
In contrast, a good portion of lighter body reds have greater acidity but less tannins.
Both components offer a needed structure for safe aging and an enhanced palate.
Of course it is a dance, and all components have to be balanced: fruit, acidity, tannins, alcohol, aromatics.
Harmony is the goal.

Red fruit vs dark fruit 
Another differentiation is the “red fruit” character which leans towards red currant, wild cherry, strawberry, cranberry versus the “dark fruit” of fuller wines where one finds more blueberry, fig, blackberry and prune.

Food friendly
Because these lighter wines are built with a lower pH and higher acidity, they are respectful in the art of food-pairing.
Just as one will incorporate lime, lemon or verjus to accentuate flavor notes in a recipe, these wines can integrate and act as a palate cleanser while inserting themselves seamlessly.
They are “assertive and refreshing” instead of “coating” one’s palate.

We at Dezilu raise our glass to you! Ah, and what a beautiful ruby hue sparkles in the sunshine through our glasses, where less is more, and transparency is key. 

 

 

Fun facts:

Passe-tout-grain is the only Burgundy wine that allows the blending of Gamay and Pinot Noir , cheers to that!

Pinot Meunier is better known as one of 3 grapes used in Champagne making

Corvina’s home land is in the Veneto as a key varietal in Valpolicella and Amarone

 

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